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Osgoode Hall Law Journal

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Legal scholarship must be related to legal education, so that teaching does not reflect only one aspect of legal training, whether it be black-letter law, clinical training, or feeble attempts to graft on bits of other disciplines. Instead, students must be exposed to a true synthesis of law and other disciplines and areas of learning. This will require a serious reconsideration of teaching methods, preparation of teaching materials, and ways of testing law students. Academic law should not be merely reflexive. Some attempt must be made, if possible, to avoid the intellectual lag of the law. It may be necessary to develop different streams of legal education - with a cultural intellectual degree and an intensive technocratic qualification.

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